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U.S. airlines see higher Labor Day travel demand

U.S. airlines see higher Labor Day travel demand

U.S. airlines see higher Labor Day travel demand

( U.S. airlines see higher Labor Day travel demand )

– The major U.S. airlines expect 15.6 million passengers to fly over the seven-day Labor Day travel period, up 4% from the analogous period a year ago, according to Airlines for America, the leading industry trade group.During this year’s travel period, which runs from Aug. 31 through Sept. 6, about 2.23 million passengers a day on average will take to the skies, up about 82,000 a day from last year.The busiest days are expected to be Sept. 2 and Sept. 1, respectively.
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Airlines brace for boost in travel volumes over Labor Day

Airlines brace for boost in travel volumes over Labor Day

( Airlines brace for boost in travel volumes over Labor Day )

– The airline industry is bracing for a boost in travel volumes this Labor Day weekend.ADVERTISEMENTAbout 15.6 million passengers will fly on U.S. airlines over the holiday — a 4 percent increase from the previous year, according to the latest projections from Airlines for America (A4A).Air carriers are preparing for the estimated travel growth by offering 98,000 more seats per day than they did during Labor Day in 2015.Thursday and Friday are expected to be the busiest days during the travel period, A4A said.Lower fuel costs help drive down the average price of domestic airline ticket in the first quarter of this year to $361 — the lowest level since 2010, according to the Department of Transportation (DOT).“One of the factors driving the growth is continued U.S. economic expansion.Job growth has been fairly solid in the past two months,” said John Heimlich, A4A’s vice president and chief economist, during a press call Wednesday.“But the biggest factor driving these increases in volumes is by far the pervasiveness of low fares.”Labor Day will cap off a busy summer travel season that generally avoided the massive airport security lines that dominated headlines and caused major headaches this spring.The improvements in wait times have largely been attributed to additional screeners and increased enrollment in the Transportation Security Administration’s PreCheck program.But recent technical glitches and computer outages that grounded thousands of flights on Delta Air Lines and Southwest Airlines are still fresh on the minds of many passengers.A4A, which represents most of the nation’s major airlines, emphasized that nearly 99 percent of flights in the first half of this year went on without a hitch, calling the meltdowns on Southwest and Delta “anomalies.”Meanwhile, the number of airline consumer complaints filed with the Department of Transportation’s aviation consumer protection division were down 12.2 percent during the first six months of 2016, according to agency statistics released Wednesday.“Airlines are naturally incentivized to invest in their infrastructure to ensure their IT systems run as smooth as possible,” said Sharon Pinkerton, senior vice president of legislative and regulatory policy for A4A.
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Airline group forecasts 4 pct jump in U.S. Labor Day air travel

Airline group forecasts 4 pct jump in U.S. Labor Day air travel

( Airline group forecasts 4 pct jump in U.S. Labor Day air travel )

– WASHINGTON Aug 17 A U.S. airline trade group said on Wednesday it expects American air travel to rise 4 percent over the Labor Day holiday to 15.6 million passengers.Airlines for America, the industry trade group, said it expects over the seven-day period starting Aug. 31 that airlines will offer 2.54 million seats a day, up 98,000 over the same period last year.The group said expanded schedules and declines in air fares account for the increase.
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